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                                        Volume. 11947

Music Museum of Iran displays Qajar era instrument donated by Japanese expert
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Japanese musicologist Tsuge Gen’ichi (R) hands over a Qajar era tar to Music Museum of Iran Director Ali Moradkhani in Tehran on March 13, 2014. Gen’ichi donated the instrument to the museum in late February. (Mehr/Mahmud Rahimi)
Japanese musicologist Tsuge Gen’ichi (R) hands over a Qajar era tar to Music Museum of Iran Director Ali Moradkhani in Tehran on March 13, 2014. Gen’ichi donated the instrument to the museum in late February. (Mehr/Mahmud Rahimi)
TEHRAN – The five-stringed Qajar era tar, previously donated by the Japanese music specialist Tsuge Gen’ichi to the Music Museum of Iran in late February, was unveiled during a ceremony on Thursday.
 
Gen’ichi, Deputy Culture Minister for Artistic Affairs Ali Moradkhani who is also the director of the museum, tar virtuoso Keyvan Saket, composer Farhad Fakhreddini and a number of other Iranian musicians attended the ceremony.
 
Speaking at the ceremony, Gen’ichi said that he had visited Iran many years ago, when he was conducting research work on Iranian traditional music.
 
Gen’ichi who was speaking in Persian, continued that he was studying Persian at the University of Tehran when he began learning to play the setar from Iranian musician Nasrollah Zarrinpanjeh.
 
It was in those years when master Zarrinpanjeh suggested purchasing the rare tar, he added.
 
The five-stringed tar was made by master Farajollah 150 years ago during the reign of the Qajar king Nasser ad-Din Shah (1831-1896).
 
Moradkhani next made a brief speech and said that Tsuge is a researcher who knows Persian music well; he is also familiar with Persian culture.
 
He added that the museum is ready to host international events in the coming years.
 
The tar was next handed to Saket, who chose to play several Iranian traditional compositions. 
 
Next, the five-stringed tar was placed in the museum beside other old and rare tars with six strings.
 
Gen’ichi had used the tar when he taught music at various Japanese universities over the years.
 
RM/YAW
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