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                                        Volume. 11932
Ukraine issues arrest warrant for President Yanukovych
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c_330_235_16777215_0___images_stories_edim_01_Ukraine99(7).jpgUkraine's new authorities issued an arrest warrant on Monday for mass murder against ousted President Viktor Yanukovych, who is on the run after being toppled by bloody street battles.
 
Russia, Yanukovych's main backer, cast doubt on the legitimacy of the new Ukrainian authorities, declaring that Russian citizens' lives were under threat there, and contacted NATO to express concern.
 
"An official case for the mass murder of peaceful citizens has been opened," Avakov wrote on his Facebook profile. "Yanukovych and other people responsible for this have been declared wanted."
 
Yanukovych, 63, who fled Kiev by helicopter on Friday, was still at large after heading first to his power base in the east, where he was prevented from flying out of the country, and then diverting south to Crimea, acting interior minister Arsen Avakov said.
 
Yanukovych had left a private residence in Balaclava, in pro-Russian Crimea, for an unknown destination by car with one of his aides and a handful of security guards, Avakov said.
 
Meanwhile, Russia recalled its ambassador from Kiev for consultations on Sunday, accusing the opposition of having torn up a transition agreement with the president it supported.
 
Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev said Monday Moscow had grave doubts about the legitimacy of those now in power in Ukraine and their recognition by some states was an "aberration".
 
"We do not understand what is going on there. There is a real threat to our interests and to the lives of our citizens," Medvedev was quoted as saying by Russian news agencies.
 
He said that the new authorities have come to power as a result of "armed mutiny," so their legitimacy is causing "big doubts."
 
He said that Russia doesn't know with whom to communicate in Ukraine, and criticized the West for recognizing the new authorities following the ouster of Yanukovych.
 
Russia cited a duty to protect the lives of its citizens in 2008 as one justification for military intervention in Georgia, another former Soviet republic, in support of Kremlin-backed separatists in South Ossetia.
 
European Union foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton arrived in Kiev to discuss measures to shore up the ailing economy, which the finance ministry said needs urgent financial assistance to avoid default.
 
The EU has contacted the United States, Japan, China, Canada and Turkey to coordinate aid for Ukraine, a senior European Commission official said. France's foreign minister said an international donors' conference was being discussed.

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