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                                        Volume. 11951
Iran nuclear deal was a major event of Iranian calendar year: professor
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TEHRAN – A South Alabama University professor says he believes that the interim nuclear deal signed by Iran and the six major powers -- the five permanent members of the UN Security Council plus Germany -- was one of the most important events of the Iranian calendar year, which ends on March 20, 2014.
 
In an interview with the Tehran Times, Nader Entessar said, “Finally, the new developments in Iran’s relations with the so-called 5+1 countries must be considered significant, especially if a win-win solution is reached at the end of the rounds of nuclear negotiations between the two sides.”
 
Q: What was the most important international event of Iranian calendar year 1392 (March 2013-March 2014)?
 
A: As the end of the Iranian year approaches, the crisis in Ukraine can perhaps be considered as the most significant development in international relations. The unfolding events in that country may have far reaching repercussions beyond the Russian-Ukraine relations and will impact Russia’s relations with the West, in general, and the United States, in particular. It will also affect how Russia will re-calibrate its national security calculus in the next few years.
 
The turns and twists in what has been called “The Arab Spring” must also be considered as another seminal development in international relations during the past year. The re-emergence of a military regime in Egypt and the continuing repression in many other Arab countries are turning the Arab Spring into an Arab Winter.
 
Finally, the new developments in Iran’s relations with the so-called 5+1 countries must be considered significant, especially if a win-win solution is reached at the end of the rounds of nuclear negotiations between the two sides. A successful solution to Iran’s nuclear stand-off can enhance Iran’s regional and global standing.
 
Q: Where is the world heading? Do you think the world is moving toward a “Lockean” or “Hobbesian” or “Kantian” system? 
 
A: With respect to the question of order in the international system, I consider myself as a follower of the school of realism in international relations. In 1977, the late international relations theorist Hedley Bull published a seminal book entitled The Anarchical Society: A Study of Order in World Politics. This book is considered a founding text of the English School of international relations. As Bull noted, since there is no hierarchically superior, coercive power that can resolve disputes, enforce law, or maintain order effectively in the international system, the world is akin to an anarchic system. What Bull posited several decades ago is still valid. In other words, the international system is still closer to a Hobbesian system than anything else. I do not see any significant change in the “anarchic” nature of international relations in the near future.
 
PY/MS/HG

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