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                                        Volume. 12119

Sanctions taking their toll on Iranian patients
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c_330_235_16777215_0___images_stories_edim_02_ep1(98).jpgTEHRAN – The international sanctions imposed on Iran over its nuclear program are taking their toll on Iranian patients whose access to life-saving drugs has become severely restricted, the Guardian wrote in an article published on Sunday. 
 
Following are excerpts of the article: 
 
Hundreds of thousands of Iranians with serious illnesses have been put at imminent risk by the unintended consequences of international sanctions, which have led to dire shortages of life-saving medicines such as chemotherapy drugs for cancer and blood clotting agents for hemophiliacs. 
 
Western governments have built waivers into the sanctions regime – aimed at persuading Tehran to curb its nuclear program – in an effort to ensure that essential medicines get through, but those waivers are not functioning, as they conflict with blanket restrictions on banking, as well as bans on “dual-use” chemicals which might have a military application. 
 
“Sometimes companies agree to sell us drugs but we have no way of paying them. On one occasion, our money was in the bank for four months but the transfer repeatedly got rejected,” Naser Naghdi, the director general of Darou Pakhsh, the country’s biggest pharmaceutical company, told the Guardian, in a telephone interview from Tehran.
 
“There are patients for whom a medicine is the difference between life and death. What is the world doing about this? Are Britain, Germany, and France thinking about what they are doing? If you have cancer and you can’t find your chemotherapy drug, your death will come soon. It is as simple as that.”
 
European officials are aware of the potential for disaster reminiscent of the debacle of the UN oil-for-food program imposed on Iraq under Saddam Hussein, and discussions are underway in Brussels on how to strengthen safeguards for at-risk Iranians. The U.S. treasury says its office of foreign asset control is seeking to reassure banks that they will not be penalized for financing humanitarian sales.
 
However, the U.S. and EU bans on doing business with the major Iranian financial institutions still make such transactions extremely difficult and risk-averse western companies have tended to avoid them.  
 
Naghdi, the head of Darou Pakhsh, which supplies about a third of Iran’s pharmaceutical needs, said he can no longer buy medical equipment such as autoclaves (sterilizing machines), essential for the production of many drugs, and that some of the biggest western pharmaceutical companies refuse to have anything to do with Iran.
 
“The west lies when it says it hasn’t imposed sanctions on our medical sector. Many medical firms have sanctioned us,” Naghdi said.
 
A senior British official acknowledged that discussions between London, Brussels, and Washington had been going on for months with the aim of unblocking the supply of medicines, but without a decisive outcome. “The problem is that for some of the big pharmaceutical companies and banks it’s just not worth the hassle and the risk of reputational damage, so they just steer clear,” the official said.
 
The scale of the looming Iranian health crisis threatens to overwhelm recent efforts to mitigate the sanctions regime. At present 85,000 new cancer patients are diagnosed each year, requiring chemotherapy and radiotherapy which are now scarce. Iranian health experts say that annual figure has nearly doubled in five years, referring to a “cancer tsunami” most likely caused by air, water, and soil pollution and possibly cheap low-quality imported food and other products.
 
In addition, there are over 8,000 hemophiliacs who are finding it harder to get blood clotting agents. Operations on hemophiliacs have been virtually suspended because of the risks created by the shortages. An estimated 23,000 Iranians with HIV/Aids have had their access to the drugs they need to keep them alive severely restricted. The society representing the 8,000 Iranians suffering from thalassaemia, an inherited blood disorder, has said its members are beginning to die because of a lack of an essential drug, deferoxamine, used to control the iron content in the blood.
 
In the absence of an official supply, the drug market is being flooded with smuggled products. Many arrive on donkeys from Turkey, but there is no way of knowing which products are counterfeit and which are real. The drugs routinely spoil on the long, precarious journey over the rugged frontier. A drugs bazaar has boomed on Tehran’s Naser Khosrow Street, but prices have doubled in a few years and the provenance and authenticity of the medicines on sale are questionable.
 
EP/PA

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