Iranian, Turkish state archives directors meet in Istanbul

February 21, 2008

TEHRAN – Iran National Library and Archives (INLA) Director Ali-Akbar Ash’ari held talks with the director of Turkey’s state archives, Yusuf Sarinay, in a meeting in Istanbul on Tuesday.

They both stressed the necessity of increasing bilateral cooperation and the provision of facilities for researchers to readily access documents kept in the archives of both countries.
Ash’ari, referring to the importance of documents in historical studies, said, “It is a pleasure to see that both nations hold the same opinion with regards to the importance of historical research and documents since we can thus be of greater assistance to scholars who are working on various projects.”
Sarinay also stated that the Turkish archive establishment is prepared to collaborate with INLA and Iranian researchers at any time.
“In addition to the exchange of documents, the speeding up of scientific and cultural cooperation between the two countries and the subsequent support of researchers will be a means whereby the friendship between Iran and Turkey will deepen,” Sarinay added.
Ash’ari met with Mustafa Budak, the manager of the Ottoman Archives and discussed the issue of exchanging documents with INLA.
They also agreed to hold exhibitions simultaneously in both countries in autumn 2008 featuring documents highlighting Iranian-Turkish ties in the Ottoman era. In addition, they agreed to publish a two-volume book next year containing documents relating to ties between Iran and Turkey. The holding of a conference covering the history of the two countries was also discussed at the meeting.
Ash’ari held talks with the director of the Suleymaniye Library in Istanbul and announced that Iranian experts are ready to assist by listing the Persian manuscripts kept at the library.
Meanwhile, an exhibition of Persian manuscripts was inaugurated at the National Library of Turkey on Tuesday.
Ismet Yilmaz, the undersecretary of Turkey’s Ministry of Culture and Tourism and INLA president Ash’ari attended the opening ceremony.
Rare copies of Islamic literary and mystical works in the Persian language as well as a Persian manuscript of the book Kimyaye Sa’adat (The Alchemy of Happiness) by the Iranian mystic and theologian Mohammad al-Ghazali, which was written 700 years ago, have been put on display for three days.