28% rise in visits to Hamedan attractions during Noruz

April 11, 2022 - 20:13

TEHRAN – Visits by Noruz vacationers to historical sites and natural sights of Hamedan jump 28 percent over the Iranian new year holidays (March 21-April 2) compared to the same period last year, the provincial tourism chief has said. 

Some 772,000 tourists and travelers toured tourist attractions and historical sites across the west-central province during the mentioned period, Ali Malmir explained on Sunday. 

Noruz trippers also made some 120,000 overnight stays at the province’s authorized accommodation centers such as hotels, apartment hotels, and guest houses, the official added. 

During the time noted, 14 handicraft markets were established throughout the province, which sold more than 50 billion rials ($187,000), he noted. 

Known in classical times as Ecbatana, Hamedan was one of the ancient world’s greatest cities. Pitifully little remains from antiquity, but significant parts of the city center are given over to excavations. Ecbatana was the capital of Media and subsequently a summer residence of the Achaemenian kings who ruled Persia from 553 to 330 BC.

Hamedan has had many names: it was possibly the Bit Daiukki of the Assyrians, Hangmatana, or Agbatana, to the Medes, and Ecbatana to the Greeks. One of the Median capitals, under Cyrus II (the Great; died 529 BC) and later Achaemenian rulers, it was the site of a royal summer palace.

About 1220 Hamedan was destroyed by the Mongols. In 1386 it was sacked by Timur (Tamerlane), a Turkic conqueror, and the inhabitants were massacred. It was partly restored in the 17th century and subsequently changed hands often between Iranian ruling houses and the Ottomans.

Sitting on a high plain, Hamedan is graciously cool in August but snow prone and freezing from December to March. In summer the air is often hazy. Ganjnameh inscriptions, Avicenna Mausoleum, Alisadr Cave, Hegmataneh hill, Alaviyan dome, Jameh mosque, and St. Stephanos Gregorian Church are amongst Hamedan’s attractions to name a few.

ABU/AFM 


 

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