Movies from Iran line up for Providence Children’s Film Festival

February 13, 2021 - 18:42

TEHRAN – Eight movies by Iranian filmmakers are competing in the Providence Children’s Film Festival (PCFF) currently underway in the capital city of the U.S. state of Rhode Island.

The films are “Borderless” by Behrad Sahebqarani, “A Girl from Parsian” by Parinaz Hashemi Mobarakeh, “Rainbow” by Mohammad Khalili, “The Rotation” by Hazhir As’adi, “Wooden Sword” by Behzad Alavi and Susan Salamat, “One Nice Day” by Susan Salamat, “The Eleventh Step” by Maryam Kashkulinia and “Gando” by Teimur Qaderi.

“Borderless” is competing in the Live Action Short category. The film is about Delaram, a teenage girl who was born with Down’s syndrome. She is very aware of being treated differently by others and feels that there is a border between everyone she encounters. Delaram has come up with a unique coping mechanism to maintain happiness in her life. The imagination can be a powerful tool.

This section also features “Rainbow”. In this film, a young flower vendor working a street corner comes across something that is not his. The events that follow show his regret and misunderstanding of other people’s intentions.

“Wooden Sword” has also been selected for this section. It tells the story of two young boys who meet on a park bench while waiting for their fathers to return. Little do they know that their fathers have not formed a friendship like they just have. Is what they see next something that might stay with them forever?

“One Nice Day” is also competing in this section. An elementary school teacher is given an opportunity to give away one new book bag to a student in his class. To decide, everyone writes a name on a piece of paper and tosses it into a bag, and then the teacher pulls out the winner. Little did he know... the drawing was rigged!

“Gando” and “A Girl From Parsian” have been picked for the documentary short competition.

“Gando” is about the water crisis in Sistan and Baluchistan Province. Villagers must go to local ponds and rivers to get what they need on a daily basis. Once you are on the river bank you must be very careful because gandos (Iranian crocodiles) live there as well. 

This documentary tells the story of a nine-year-old girl named Hawa who lost her arm one-day getting water. It’s also a story about, despite the gando being a threat, the villagers respect the gando because they believe they help bring the water.

“A Girl from Parsian” is an insightful documentary about a group of young Iranian women who wish to ride their bikes and the resistance they encounter from men of all ages.

“The Eleventh Step” and “The Rotation” are competing in a section dedicated to short animations.

“The Eleventh Step” is about a little lion cub, born in a zoo. He lives in a cage that is only ten steps long. On the eleventh step, he bangs his head against the bars, but one day the zookeeper leaves the cage door open.  

In “The Rotation”, there is a war between two tribes over claiming the sun in the sky. As a result of that war, the sun is annihilated and a volcano erupts. Those two tribes perish and a new sun is made by the lava. Several centuries pass and the new tribes continue to war over their claim to the sun in the sky. The sad cycle continues.

The Providence Children’s Film Festival (PCFF), which is organized online due to the pandemic, will come to an end on February 21 with the announcement of winners.

Photo: “Gando” by Teimur Qaderi.

MMS/YAW
 

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