By Mohammad Mazhari

U.S. has long been divided: American writer

February 3, 2021 - 11:18

TEHRAN - An American writer says that the United States is divided into camps over supporting unregulated globalism.

 “One camp, favor unregulated globalism, want to transition to a world led by China and perhaps India,” Charles Ortel tells the Tehran Times.

“The other camp looks at globalist organizations and sees claims of success that are not supported by convincing evidence, and clear suggestions of influence peddling, corruption, fraud, waste, and other abuses,” the pro-Trump author adds.

Asked about dangers of a “deep state” in America, Ortel notes that “President Eisenhower warned of the dangers posed by the military-industrial complex in his farewell speech to America in January 1961.”

He warns that “Americans have willingly engaged with social media and in transactions that give governments and bad actors access to information that can be used to control citizens.”

The following is the text of the interview:

 “Financially, the U.S. is twenty years down a path of reckless spending and borrowing to pay for vast bureaucracies that claim success fighting a raft of enemies, or progress redressing social injustice but cannot, or will not explain, with verifiable evidence, why Americans are better off in 2021 than we were in 2001, before September 11th.”Q: What is Trump going to do now that he has lost to Joe Biden in the presidential elections? Do you predict Trump would form an opposition bloc?

A: Unlike most former Presidents, Donald Trump has extensive business interests, a major brand name, and a vast network of supporters. 

In business, one obvious place to focus is creating a vibrant set of media and social media platforms for the tens of millions of conservatives who likely have been suppressed or even canceled on Twitter, Facebook, and traditional news outlets.

In politics, Trump is likely to continue reforming the Republican Party, concentrating on attracting voters hurt by unregulated globalism, especially including disaffected Democrats and Independents.
Trump is a master at creating and milking suspense over his future course of action. If he is successful in 2022 changing the complexion of the Republican party and taking the Senate, the House or both, he may well run for President again in 2023 and 2024.


Q: What are Biden’s main presidential challenges?

A: Politically, President Biden is caught between satisfying demands from hard-left progressives and suffering blowback from disgruntled Trump supporters. The more he placates the hard left, the more he will encourage those who revere the U.S. Constitution to rise up, peaceably in opposition and likely add to the Trump base.

Financially, the U.S. is twenty years down a path of reckless spending and borrowing to pay for vast bureaucracies that claim success fighting a raft of enemies, or progress redressing social injustice but cannot, or will not explain, with verifiable evidence, why Americans are better off in 2021 than we were in 2001, before September 11th.

These challenges are monstrous ones. Topping them off is Joe Biden's great difficulty relating to the average American, credibly showing he is sensible, in charge and actually tackling problems that affect most of us. At a time when technology and low-cost human labor pose daunting threats to American workers whose pay is high compared to world scale, the Biden administration seems determined to destroy private-sector jobs and reverse Trump's manifest success taming elements of our government bureaucracy.

Q: Trump’s critics say that he has divided the country. How can this rift be healed?

A: Americans have long been divided, particularly so since 1989.

One camp, those who favor unregulated globalism, want to transition to a world led by China and perhaps India. This group typically includes academics, mainstream media, wealthy investors, executives at multinational companies and philanthropists. Here, and in many countries, those who worship at the World Economic Forum and similar locations believe their path is the one towards greater glory and that doubters are not smart enough to understand the progress they offer.

The other camp looks at globalist organizations and sees claims of success that are not supported by convincing evidence, and clear suggestions of influence peddling, corruption, fraud, waste and other abuses.
An irony is that technology gives most humans abilities to interact frugally without depending upon expensive governments to protect us. 
In the U.S. and in many nations with ageing expensive workforces, the battle between those advocating for unregulated globalism, and those favoring reform of ineffective and bloated governments at home is far from over.

Q:      What do you expect in regard to the impeachment bill against Trump?

A: Trump seems likely to have his lawyers question the validity of the second impeachment in several ways.

First, he may question the short length of time taken to gather and stress test the allegations inherent in the impeachment article.

Second, he may question whether a former President can be convicted in an impeachment trial in any case.

Third, he may refuse to participate in the proceeding unless the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court reconsiders and decides to officiate.

At this moment, the odds of finding 17 out of 50 Republican Senators to convict Donald Trump seem remote. So, it may be the House and Senate adjust their strategies and seek to pass motions of censure, instead.

Q: What is your comment on what is called U.S. “deep state”? Does it have a determining role? 

A: President Eisenhower warned of the dangers posed by the military-industrial complex in his farewell speech to America in January 1961. Since then, Americans have willingly engaged with social media and in transactions that give governments and bad actors access to information that can be used to control citizens, visitors and foreigners alike. When these deep state actors break laws, they seldom, if ever, are brought to account.

Accepting terms of service that are one-sided, to send an email, exchange information, or store data, we have become hostages, even slaves to digital masters, who are readily manipulated by security services, law enforcement, and even by partisan politicians.
Until we change relationships with these digital overlords and until we change our patterns of interaction, each of us stands to lose much as we live out precious days and years of life remaining on this earth.

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